Hamptons Style Done the Australian Way

Hamptons Style Done the Australian Way

Everyone is loving Hamptons style, the cool and clever beach-style reputed to have started in Maine, USA, in the beachside Hamptons area. There’s much to love about Hamptons style even if you don’t live by the beach.

Hamptons style is perfect for coastal areas, perhaps nowhere as much as in Queensland. The colour and style of classic Hamptons design can be showcased in suburbs with traditional character and heritage. However, the cool grey, crisp white and calming beige tones are more at home by the beach.

Building project by Coral Homes

New home builders are now embracing the charm of Hamptons style with clients more frequently asking for this type of design. Certainly in my work in interior design and renovation, I am often asked for a ‘Hamptons with a Twist’ aesthetic. Of course, one of the classic features of a Hamptons home is weatherboard cladding. Whilst it can be quite ornate in the USA, for the Australian market a more refined and less adorned cladding is required.

Australia’s Own Hamptons Style

James Hardie has released cladding and decking perfectly designed for the Hamptons style with an Australian twist. Cladding is a staple of the Hamptons home. However, traditional weatherboard can be difficult to maintain and prone to degradation over time.

The James Hardie Linea Weatherboards are easy to install, are resistant to warping, flaking and damage caused by moisture or fire. So in our Australian climate, these Hampton style approved weatherboards look better for longer and are easier to maintain. Constructed from thick fibre cement, this cladding creates a deep, defined shadow similar to the texture of traditional shingles used in the USA.

Hamptons Style Isn’t Just About Cladding

To continue the Hamptons look, use Linea Weatherboards for other features such as planter boxes and feature walls. This creates a sense of continuity, which is important for any decor or design project.

Australians love their indoor-outdoor living so Hamptons style is perfect for this type of living. Many home owners are opening up the back of their homes with bi-fold and stacker doors leading to an al fresco area. Whether you have a pergola or pool area, HardieDeck creates a seamless floor out to the garden working in harmony with a Hamptons aesthetic.

HardieDeck is an attractive decking option. It’s also environmentally durable reducing the high maintenance often required by a traditional timber deck. The ideal choice for coastal living, HardieDeck is made from premium fibre cement making it resistant to most coastal elements.

Coastal Colours Give Hamptons Style A Calm Quality

Traditional Hamptons homes draw upon the colours of the environment – blue seas, cream foam, beige sands, white clouds – you get the picture. In my work, there are two dominating colour palettes – grey based or beige based. Add blues, greens, and whites to suit your taste. Plus a little black to toughen things up.Being beach side inspired, you’ll see textures including jute, linen, cotton and wool plus trims in nautical inspired textures such as rope.

Remember the exterior cladding? Well it can also be used for interior feature walls. Hamptons style evokes the beach. So interior feature walls in a weatherboard can mimic beach side fencing and railings. Use Linea Weatherboard for feature walls in virtually any room to create interest and inject texture.

Kitchens and bathrooms are also calm spaces often decorated in white with marble countertops and slim black accents. White areas are also perfect for chrome, brushed nickel, black or gold tapware or cabinet handles. Don’t be afraid to mix metals. For example, black cabinet handles with gold-trimmed pendant lights. Or brushed nickel cabinet handles with black tapware.

So whether you are building a new home or planning to renovate, the Hamptons style re-engineered for the Australian environment is a popular choice. If you live by the beach, add more blues. If you live in the hills, add more green. Create a clam sanctuary for you and your family. The Hamptons popularity will live on because it’s classic and timeless… in your own way.

Made To Be Broken… Design Rules That Is

Made To Be Broken… Design Rules That Is

I’ve never been one to play by the rules (just ask my Mother) so I do like to break a few design rules in my interior design work too.  If you want to create edgier décor, then be open to breaking a few design rules… just like these.

#1 Art Should Always Be Hung At Eye Level

The question here is at whose eye level should art be hung? People with differing heights usually populate homes. Moreover, we don’t stand around looking at the walls. We lie on the floor, sit on chairs, lounge on sofas, and relax on beds.

Try placing a large artwork on the floor (secure it if you have children). Hang an artwork high up on a flight of stairs to draw the eye up and be a point of difference. Play with size and scale by mixing up the prints and frames for an eclectic effect.

#2 Always Match Timbers

As an interior designer, I am never a fan of matchy-matchy anything let alone timbers. When faced with timber floors, wooden kitchen cupboards, wooden furniture and wooden doors homeowners can panic about matching all the woods. Natural timbers are warm with a unique personality.

Timber works fabulously with almost anything including concrete, stone, metals, tiles, etc. This is one of the silly design rules you shouldn’t be afraid to break. However, don’t mix more than 3 or 4 timbers and choose woods with similar undertones (warm or cool).

Plush Design Interiors

#3 Never Mix Metals

Again, matchy-matchy usually breeds boring interiors. Mixing metals adds character and depth to interiors especially in wet areas. The trick is to mix cool metals – stainless steel, chrome, silver – with warm metals – copper, brass, rose gold, gold.

I am obsessed with black metal windows, as they don’t ‘frame’ the view they blend it and seem to disappear. So if you choose black metal frames for window or art, mix with warm copper lights or other warm metals.

#4 Paint Your Ceilings White

Why? I often recommend painting a ceiling in quarter strength of the wall colour. This creates a cosy room with an intimate feel.

Painting a ceiling in a darker colour will draw the eye down so you can focus on the view or another feature. Even wallpaper a ceiling for drama or a calming effect.

Plush Design Interiors

#5 Paint Small Spaces White

This is the worst ‘rule’ ever. Absolutely break this silliest of design rules. A tiny powder room wallpapered in a bold print looks amazing. Dark colours in a small room can make it look bigger because it blurs the wall lines, especially if it has great natural light.

Natural light will help a darkly decorated room feel warm. Add reflective surfaces and mirrors to expand the space.

If you’re thinking of renovating, then please check out more expert design tips on this blog including expert renovation advice you may not have considered and renovation preparation before you start.